in(visible) nomads/emptiness of home

 “Curious head is squinting flats with grey bricks. The associations are cluttering through the needle with the drops of adrenaline, blurring the little mirrors in my chest. Stepping over the colour of distrust and reservation. Mind cuddling. Breathing out the plan.”

In this piece, I study the term “habitation” as a passive everyday action, and focus on homes as fictional objects that are impossible to be afforded by young people today. I interviewed friends who live in rented homes or with their parents, asking them to tell me a story about their living space. At one point, we bring to mind the socialist working class, i.e. our parents and grandparents, who were given their homes by their respective companies because they were valuable as workers.

I focus on comparing the past and the present as two opposite poles. Today, a company providing a home for its employee is considered pure fantasy.

With no money to afford our own home, possibilities open up for a taste of life in other countries. However, I cannot help but wonder whether we really want to do it, or whether we are merely forced into it? If we have other options – which are they?

While the interviews are emitted through speakers and a megaphone, I make an edible mixture of dried fruit, shaped in the form of my parents’ flat.

Facing a wall – this time not the one at home, but rather the impossibility of achievement – I share my frustration and helplessness with the audience by breaking the edible supporting walls of an unfulfilled dream and offering them to the public, hoping that one day it becomes

Link to audio: https://soundcloud.com/user-2799856

When did you fall in love with knowledge?

This project is a work in progress in which I focus on finding the trigger that activates our love of knowledge. During the residency programme Cultivamos Cultura in São Luis (Portugal), I interviewed artists from around the world and asked them when exactly they fell in love with knowledge, what knowledge is, and which subject they would like to invent and introduce into the school curriculum. I am pinpointing the exact period of time when we discovered knowledge and began to yearn for it. Was it during regular education? Or was it later in life? How do we awake a person’s desire for new knowledge that can be used on a daily basis? The project is a critique of existing school systems, which are based on receiving information without practical use.

With this space intervention, I seek to encourage people of all ages to share with me the creative strategies for opening up creative channels that can be applied in practical life. Having collected the statements, I wrote them down on stone blocks that I had removed from the sidewalk, and then put them back in.

Knowledge comes from my interacting with the world. Gail Hocking

Knowledge is pattern seeking: lost and found and lost and found. Before I knew what knowledge was and everytime ideas syncronize for me for the first time. Sarah Hermanutz

Knowledge is a process that takes the mistakes from the future and moves them into the past, they skip the future. Nenad Popov

Knowledge is an illusion that destroys previous ilussions. It is oximoronic endles task which allows us to turn unknown unknowns into something else, expending our awareness of our own ignorance. Manuel Furtado

Special thanks to Martha De Menezes and Cultivamos Cultura.

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Self-reflexive herbs

In this ephemeral space intervention, I planted an herbal installation in a forest area. I replanted sedum, a cover ground plant, from one part of the forest to another. With these plants, I formed the word “Working?”

I chose this word as a marking and a resting spot in the forest. I relate it to the current social and economic problems that are particularly felt by the younger generations. This is a place for reflection and self-reflection.

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Moment, now

A garden is a living thing, a place that is marked and sometimes abandoned.
The basic concept of the project was to plant a land art installation with medicinal and edible herbs. The herbs were shaped like letters, forming the sentence “Moment, Now.”

By studying the period of “now-time,” I seek to determine which common thoughts get our minds “out” of the present moment. When I say present-presence, I do not necessarily mean one’s total concentration, but rather a more spontaneous and natural awareness of the present moment through creative activity.

The meaning of the word “now” subtly pervades through the issues in my immediate society, such as uncertainty, volatility, corruption, environmental and social crisis, etc.

By using the gesture of planting, I occupy myself, I seek to leave the product of my experience to viewers and passers-by.

For me, creativity has a lot of different variations, views and actions, which produce an interpretation of a specific issue. I use performance as a medium that creates awareness of the body, and plant-based living space installations that bring us back to the “moment of now” when planted.

Special thanks to Ars Kozara for their support and help with this project.

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To have or to be

In this exhibition, the stones mark a ritual, a persistent game of the waves and passage of time, as well as a change in form. I am stopping the flow of waves by breaking their persistence and claiming the stones as the ritual continues. The process results in text printed on the stones; sometimes recipes, sometimes drawings of plants. Many of the captions have a cynical deflection such as “Tea to fight capitalism” or “Mixture against greed.”

I present several unprinted pebbles and a tool for writing on the stones. I ask the viewer to intervene in the form of comments on the unprinted stones.
I combine environmental and social issues with the problem of education. Let us bring to mind what Plato said a long time ago: “Ignorance is the root of all evil.” His opinion counters the entire Western-Christian civilization, which aims at raising hordes of illiterate believers/consumers to blindly serve the newly-fabricated nationalism or religious dogma.
It reveals that environmental issues are parallel to the problems caused by poor and profit-based education. Bad environmental solutions can be fixed with good education, since education broadens horizons and sharpens the perception of the world around us. An educated individual can more easily resist bouts of nationalism, discrimination by colour or sexual orientation, etc. Education brings with itself a freer approach to life and facilitates breaking free from dogma. An educated person is not susceptible to advertising or opinions of political usurpation. Education brings with itself the idea of sharing. An educated person is aware of environmental neglect and the aggressive exploitation brought upon by neoliberalism.

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Herb Path, Mother Earth

My environmental art project  for  Rauma Artist-in-Residence programme involves  planting aromatic herbs in Seminar  Garden and a plant installation placed on the trees in the town’s main street . I have marked a route from downtown to the Seminar  Garden by hanging cloth bags  with  medicinal plants growing in them on the trees. On the bags I have written some of my recipes like TEA AGAINST EXPLOITATION : ”Mix equal amounts of dried dandelion root, calendula flower and leaf of hyssop. Use as tea:  1 full teaspoon per  1 cup, and drink 2-3 unsweetened  cups  a  day in small sips. Dandelion root cleanses the liver, gallbladder, kidneys and lymph. First of all dandelion root cleanses the liver and gallbladder  and stimulates the kidneys so the toxins are sent  out of the body.” I meet pupils at school and they can design their own plant for a certain new  purpose to make their life better.

One of the things that influences my artistic work are the problems  that more and more young people are experiencing. I am trying to offer a solution to some of the major symptoms of depression such as  weakness, apathy, lack of incentives, self-doubt, feelings of worthlessness, hopelessness, meaninglessness, lack of energy  etc. through planting healthy herbs.

With my project I am  researching  the ways how community art:  planting and positioning art work in a public space, can engage people by offering them a herbal approach into life.

The main idea of my project was to plant a garden of healthy and edible herbs.  Herbs are planted in the Seminar Garden in a shape of my silhouette, a young woman, which I call ”Mother Earth”. A garden is a living thing, a place which is marked and sometimes abandoned.  Within the process of planting and exchanging the knowledge of medicinal and edible herbs with young and older people, I want to encourage public discussion and articulation of the current problems of the people (in the community). Do we still collect, grow and use plants for medical purposes?

Art gardening is a tool which can be used in a wider sense  for  waking up people  in creating a widespread resistance of unnecessary consumption, in relaxation and returning  people into  the peacefulness of nature.

Special thanks to Raumars Artist in Residency Program for their support and help with my project.

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Communication Through Herbs, 2012.

Nature, the countryside and everything built around a certain locality is its surrounding. When I moved away from the tall buildings and skyscrapers to the east side of the city, where family houses dominated, I have found myself in completely new surroundings. After a while I wanted to conceive my own way of communication with the new ambience and the people living in it. I’ve noticed that in front of every front door there is a small well-decorated garden. Motivated by it, I’ve started to plant herbs and flowers on my balcony. I have raised the pots from the ground and wrapped them into colorful fabrics so that people passing by could easily notice them. When the seeds started to grow I have also started writing interesting pieces of information about the plants in chalk on the street. For example: “Coriander has sprouted. Tea from its seeds has medicinal properties. I am still waiting for rosemary, thyme and basil to shoot up.” Children were the first to notice my activity on the street, some of them joining me, drawing in colored chalk further down the street. The highlight of the action was when the plants had grown enough for me to replant them in the new pots, leaving them in front of every neighbors door. I have exhibited this piece at the SC Gallery in October 2012.